Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Latest news and features from theguardian.com, the world's leading liberal voice

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6)

    0 0

    Our writers outline what is at stake for those around the world likely to be immediately affected by Donald Trump’s presidency

    Syrian opposition left with nowhere to turn after Trump’s victory

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    From the wrong kind of fish off our coasts, to divorcees stuck in marital limbo, Britain’s painful extraction from the EU will send shockwaves through almost every part of our lives. Here are just some of the side-effects...

    After he took the role of international trade secretary, Fox boasted that he would have “about a dozen free trade deals outside the EU” ready for when Britain left. But it is illegal for Britain, as an EU member state, to negotiate bilateral trade deals. Fox later quietly backtracked on his promise. No one knows what he’s doing with his time at the moment.

    Related: Holidays, equal pay – Brexit threatens these rights. We are fighting to keep them | Jason Moyer Lee

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A Canadian trade expert has no illusions about the complexities we face

    The British government continues to plod along without a Brexit strategy with the deadline for invoking article 50 fast approaching. Sir Ivan Rogers, head of the British representation in Brussels, recently conceded as much in what has become a public resignation. “We do not yet know what the government will set as negotiating objectives for the UK’s relationship with the EU after exit,” Rogers wrote to staff as he departed.

    Related: UK at risk of Brexit ‘catastrophe’ warns Canadian trade expert

    Related: EU and Canada sign Ceta free trade deal

    Related: The 'Canadian model': why Ceta isn't a blueprint for Brexit

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    CBI director general urges politicians to wake up to limitations of WTO terms and dangers of a sudden exit from EU

    Britain risks a “disorderly crash landing” if it assumes it can safely walk away from troublesome Brexit talks, business leaders have said, in a last-ditch plea for a negotiated settlement with Europe.

    As Theresa May prepares to reveal an uncompromising set of UK objectives on Tuesday, pressure is mounting on the prime minister to take a firm line with other member states and ultimately fall back on World Trade Organisation tariffs if no deal can be agreed.

    Related: Hard or soft Brexit? Theresa May can have both | Matthew d’Ancona

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    As many people suspected, and as is becoming more and more obvious, the UK, with its sweatshop economy, weak productivity and huge trade deficit, is going to find itself in very chilly waters after we leave the EU (‘Unsettled’ Brexit will hit UK growth, 17 January). If we succeed in making trade treaties they will mostly be on very unfavourable terms, as we will be on the weak side in most cases (especially with China, the US and the EU). It also becomes more and more obvious that in order to achieve even unfavourable terms we will have to submit to being dominated by big international companies, which will lead to the reintroduction of TTIP-style disputes procedures, a bonfire of labour and environmental protections and policies only acceptable to the hard right of the Conservative party. Brexit is wrong and dangerous: the only way forward is to reverse it.
    Jeremy Cushing
    Exeter

    • I read with distress your article (Brexit rush for US trade deal could force tough concessions, say critics, theguardian.com, 16 January). I found the comments of the UK’s ambassador to Washington staggering. For such a senior official to imply that farming is a low priority is worrying. Theresa May said on Tuesday that no trade deal is better than a bad trade deal. It is clear to me that a deal that fundamentally damages a country’s ability to feed an urbanised population through short, secure, local supply chains should be firmly categorised as a truly bad deal and one the government should avoid at all costs.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The denizens of Davos reassured themselves that free trade would go on in the Trump era, but they had for years done little about the losers such a system creates

    His speech was like one normally expected of an American president. Countries must resist the temptation to retreat into harbour, the world leader said to a packed and admiring audience, but instead have the courage to swim in the vast ocean of the global market.

    This was the kind of paean to free trade that might have come from John F Kennedy, George W Bush or Bill Clinton – all occupants of the White House who saw it as the United States’s role to defend the open international trading system set up at the end of the second world war.

    Related: Middle classes in crisis, IMF's Christine Lagarde tells Davos 2017

    Related: Davos 2017: Hammond fires Brexit warning; Kissinger says Trump must help rebuild world order - as it happened

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    MPs say Theresa May has no authority to pursue ‘extreme’ options for UK’s departure from Europe

    A powerful cross-party group of MPs is plotting to thwart Theresa May’s attempts to drive through a hard Brexit amid rising fears that UK businesses could soon have to pay huge export tariffs on goods they sell to the EU.

    Related: May’s speech sounded like Trump. The only thing missing was the wall | Dan Roberts

    Related: UK risks 'disorderly crash landing' on Brexit, business leaders warn

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A reality check may force the US president to climb down on his ‘America first’ rhetoric and see the merit of international bodies

    Donald Trump did not assume the US presidency as a committed multilateralist. On that, partisans of all political persuasions can agree. Among his most controversial campaign statements were some suggesting that Nato was obsolete, a position that bodes ill for his attitude to other multilateral organisations and alliances.

    Last week, however, Trump stepped back, reassuring an audience at US Central Command in Tampa, Florida (the headquarters for US forces that operate in the Middle East). “We strongly support Nato,” he declared, explaining that his “issue” with the alliance was one of full and proper financial contributions from all members, not fundamental security arrangements.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Guardian analysis shows falling back on WTO rules would mean steep bills for industries including fashion, agriculture, cars and ceramics

    Crashing out of the European Union without a trade deal would saddle British exporters with more than £6bn a year of extra costs, according to analysis that reveals the limited options facing UK negotiators just weeks before Brexit talks start.

    Theresa May has insisted “no deal is better than a bad deal” when it comes to the terms of Britain’s departure from the EU, suggesting the prime minister believes falling back on World Trade Organisation rules is a credible alternative if she cannot get her preferred option of a new free trade agreement with the EU.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Leaving the EU without a deal and falling back on WTO rules would mean paying customs duties on British exports to the EU. Guardian calculations put the annual bill at $7.6bn just in tariff costs. Here’s why

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Rafael Behr (The ‘left behind’ cliche is an excuse for political failure, 22 February) needs to go beyond castigating the complacency of the major parties with regard to their “safe” constituencies and voters. Yes, we do need to listen – but to which voices? There is a cacophony of reasons why people voted Brexit: poor job opportunities, ever weakening health provision, unaffordable housing, loss of sovereignty; no single cluster of these represents “the” reason why Brexit received a narrow plus vote last June. However, the main cause of these issues – as well as of many misplaced concerns about immigration – is the overly commercial/economic approach to globalisation that has driven financial growth above social benefit. Since the 2008 financial crisis, absolute standards of living for many people around the world have declined, and the disparity of reward between ordinary working people and those at the top of the economic tree has grown exponentially; and this was a key factor why voters in the referendum did not play according to the “rules” of politics.

    But globalisation need not be solely about trade and profit for the few. The cultural benefits are vast and rarely spelt out: travel and a growth in knowledge about different parts of the world; intercultural communication and thus increased international understanding; access to new and stimulating ideas, beliefs, and practices; rapid movement of innovations. And above all, simply coming to know people from around the world, making more and more of the globe a source of friends rather than competition. Listening on its own is not enough – we need to make our global society more human-focused.
    Paul Griseri
    La Genétouze, Charente-Maritime, France

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    PM plans to trigger article 50 ‘within days’ but all-party parliamentary committee says she is putting national interest at risk

    Theresa May has been accused by a powerful parliamentary committee of putting the national interest at risk by failing to prepare for the “real prospect” that two years of Brexit negotiations could end with no deal.

    The criticism – and warnings of dire consequences – is levelled at May by the all-party foreign affairs select committee only days before she is expected to trigger article 50 – the formal process that will end the UK’s 44-year membership of the European Union.

    Related: Brexiters and Remainers both fail to grasp the challenges facing Britain | Tom Kibasi

    Related: Labour MPs demand Corbyn backs fight to stay in single market

    Related: Arguments against single market membership illustrate a lack of ambition

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Brexit and article 50 has us all talking tariffs and quotas, but it is the less obvious stuff such as EU standards that will be decisive

    Brexit has turned Britain into a nation of trade nerds. In the past nine months, trade has gone from being too boring to mention into a subject about which everybody has a view. Those who eyes would once have glazed over at the mention of bound tariffs or trade facilitation agreements can now wax lyrical about what it would mean for Britain if it had to rely on World Trade Organistion rules after it leaves the EU.

    The new sexiness of trade was illustrated last week when the former head of the WTO made a speech at the Institute for Government in London. Pascal Lamy spent some of the best years of his life struggling to polish off the Doha round of trade liberalisation and an overspill room was needed to hear what he had to say about Britain’s likely post-Brexit deal.

    Related: UK at risk of Brexit ‘catastrophe’ warns Canadian trade expert

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Tory tensions as some MPs say they face battle against ‘bonkers’ Eurosceptics actively promoting WTO terms

    Brexiters in the cabinet and other Conservative frontbenchers have privately told colleagues they are relaxed about the prospect of Britain crashing out of the EU on to World Trade Organisation rules, the Guardian understands.

    Senior figures within the party have been persuaded by the argument that members of the WTO are less likely to try to punish the UK, while the European Union is looking to exact a political price for Brexit.

    Continue reading...

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6)